Revamping Your Anti-Harassment ProgramsIn the wake of the #MeToo movement, I have clients wanting to know what they can do both to improve their workplace and protect themselves. They all have good policies and regularly train supervisors and employees on them. So what’s next? Although there is no silver bullet, I suggest you start with the following three things.

Review Your EEO Policy

Although most EEO policies are pretty straightforward, they can always use a little polishing. Does the policy mention all of the protected categories that apply to all of your locations? As a company grows, it can find itself with employees in states or municipalities that have classifications that are not covered in the federal laws. Many states have laws explicitly prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity. Additionally, a number of federal circuit courts have ruled that Title VII’s prohibition against sex discrimination also covers discrimination based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Then there are municipalities that have covered even more categories. For example, Washington, D.C.’s Human Rights Law prohibits discrimination based on marital status, personal appearance, family responsibilities, matriculation and political affiliation.  Be sure your EEO policy is keeping up.

Review Your Harassment Policy

You need to update your harassment policy like you are updating your EEO policy. In addition to making sure the protected categories are broad enough, think about beefing up your reporting processes.

For years I have preached to clients that they need to have centralized reporting rather than having employees report to any supervisor. It is not that I want to make it hard to report—however, front line supervisors are in a tough spot. They may not have the skills to handle a complaint. Also, front line supervisors are more likely to know a lot about the complainant and the alleged perpetrator and handle it themselves. You don’t want someone discounting a report because “everyone knows the complainant is a liar” or “I know he didn’t mean anything by that.” Those are not good legal defenses.

I am coming to the conclusion that reporting hotlines, including the ability to report anonymously, may be the best options. Properly run hotlines get reports to the right people sooner. Also, if someone has the ability to report anonymously, it makes a later argument that he or she didn’t want to report because they would suffer retaliation a lot less convincing. Investigating an anonymous report presents challenges, but I think it is better to investigate what you can.

And another thing—really think about whether you want to say you have a zero tolerance policy. I find that is easily misinterpreted to mean that anyone found to have violated the harassment policy will be terminated. Is that really what you mean? I find that sexual harassment policy violations can come in a lot of different packages, ranging from unintended, thoughtless comments to boorish behavior to sexual assault. Although you can decide that you will treat all of those events the same, do you want to? In some ways, such a one-size-fits-all approach discourages complaints about behavior that we want to change, but that doesn’t deserve termination.

Revisit Your Training

Train people, and track it. New employees and new supervisors should complete training either before or shortly after they start. Everyone should go through training of some sort periodically. California requires everyone to be trained at least every two years. The State of New York has just enacted a law  that requires employers to provide annual sexual harassment prevention training.

What should your harassment training look like? New York’s new law comes with model training, including minimum standards, for employers to use. Saying that you met those standards, even if you didn’t have to, wouldn’t be a bad fact in defending a claim. So, even if you don’t have employees in New York, it may be worth looking at this material to see if there are parts you want to use.

Get company leadership on board. Having senior leadership (not just HR) involved in training gets employees’ attention and sends the message that this is important. It also gives you the opportunity to talk about workplace culture and respect for each other—more than just saying “don’t harass each other.”

Get feedback from the participants. Give them a chance to ask questions or take a test to be sure they got the message. Send a follow-up message to get feedback and see what stuck.

In a decision that could have employers rethinking how they offer employees a severance agreement, in McClellan v. Midwest Machining, Inc. the Sixth Circuit held that former employees seeking to void severance agreements do not have to give the severance pay back before filing suit under Title VII or the Equal Pay Act.

Factual Summary

Tender Me This: Sixth Circuit Holds Employees Don’t Have to Give Severance Money Back before Filing Title VII or EPA LawsuitThe facts of this case help give this legal holding some flavor. In late August 2015, Jena McClellan informed her employer, Midwest Machining, Inc., that she was pregnant. After doing so, McClellan says her supervisor started making negative comments about her pregnancy and was annoyed about the pre-natal doctor’s appointments. About three months later, Midwest Machining terminated her. The decision does not provide the articulated reason for termination.

On the date of her termination, the company’s president called McClellan into his office, gave her a severance agreement, and said that she “needed to sign then if [she] wanted any severance.” The door was shut to his office, and McClellan said she did not feel free to leave. The two reviewed the agreement together, but McClellan says the president did so very quickly, did not ensure that she understood the agreement, and used a “raised” tone during the entire meeting.

McClellan testified that she felt pressured and bullied, and she signed the agreement without the benefit of a lawyer’s counsel. The agreement waived all of her claims. McClellan later testified that she did not understand that the claims she was waiving included discrimination claims; she thought it was only claims for unpaid wages and benefits. Midwest Machining paid McClellan $4,000 in exchange for signing the agreement, and she accepted the money.

Summary Judgment Initially Granted to Employer

McClellan filed an EEOC charge claiming Midwest Machining discriminated against her, and she received her right-to-sue letter. On November 6, 2016, about a year after her termination, she finally met with an attorney, who immediately filed a lawsuit alleging pregnancy discrimination in violation of the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (which is part of Title VII) and pay discrimination in violation of the Equal Pay Act (EPA), among other claims.

Midwest Machining’s counsel informed McClellan’s lawyer of the release in the severance agreement. McClellan, at the direction of her lawyer, then sent a letter (about three weeks after the suit was filed) stating that she was rescinding the severance agreement. She enclosed a $4,000 check, the amount of the severance.

Midwest Machining responded by returning the check to McClellan, stating there was no legal basis for her to rescind the severance agreement. A couple of months later, Midwest Machining moved for summary judgment because McClellan did not “tender back” the $4,000 before she actually filed suit. After some legal wrangling, the trial court eventually agreed, relying on the common law “tender-back doctrine,” which provides that “even if a party signs a release under duress,” she must return the severance monies before she can file a lawsuit. The district court held that even if McClellan signed the severance agreement under duress (a disputed issue of fact), she did not “tender back” the severance money before she filed suit. Therefore, the district court held that she had ratified the contract waiving her claims and her lawsuit had to be dismissed.

Sixth Circuit Reverses

McClellan appealed to the Sixth Circuit, which reversed, holding that a plaintiff “is not required” to give back the severance monies before bringing claims for violations of Title VII or the EPA. The Sixth Circuit noted its concern – as expressed by other courts – that the employees would have spent their severance money already and would not be able to pay it back.

“[W]e worry that requiring recently-discharged employees to return their severance before they can bring claims under Title VII and the EPA would serve only to protect malfeasant employers at the expense of employees’ statutory protections at the very time that those employees are most economically vulnerable.”

As opposed to being a bar to suit, under the Sixth Circuit’s holding, the amount of the severance is to be deducted from any judgment awarded to a plaintiff-employee. Other federal circuits have similar holdings involving other federal employment statutes. The Sixth Circuit sent the case back to the district court for further proceedings. A dissent was filed, arguing that the case should have been remanded for further fact finding on the “tender-back” doctrine and ratification of the contract.

Takeaways

Employers should not overreact to this decision as it does not mean that severance agreements are a waste of money. This decision only addresses what happens when an employee claims duress and seeks to void the severance agreement. The key is to offer severance in a way to avoid a claim of duress.

Perhaps the biggest takeaway from this decision is don’t pressure (or look like you are pressuring) separating employees to sign severance agreements. Make sure that nothing about the circumstances surrounding the severance offer could later be used to show that the employee was under duress, fraudulently induced to sign the agreement, or any other act that would give the employee an argument to claim the contract was voidable.

Assuming McClellan’s story is true – the president of a company tells a departing employee that she has to sign the agreement that day if she wants to receive her severance – what can we learn?

  • Remember your goal is to get the employee to sign the agreement (and release any claims). The situation will be uncomfortable because the employee is losing a job, but be nice. If the company representative is intimidating or could otherwise be characterized as a bully—maybe use someone else to deliver the message. It is usually best to have two people (so if the employee later accuses someone of bad behavior, the company has a witness).
  • Give the employee a reasonable amount of time to review the agreement. If the employee is age 40 or older, follow the Older Worker’s Benefits Protection Act requirements and give the employee at least 21 days to review the agreement and seven days to revoke after signing. If the employee is not yet age 40, then give a reasonable time—say five days. Keep in mind that what is reasonable can change based on the circumstances.  Five days on Monday gives the employee a week to consult a lawyer.  Five days on Friday before a holiday weekend may not be a reasonable amount of time.
  • Allow the employee to take the agreement home to review. Think of it from the employee’s perspective—would you feel pressured or fully understand an agreement that gives up your rights while the company president is standing over your shoulder?
  • Encourage the employee to consult a lawyer as needed.

Even if you follow all of these practices, if an employee claims she was pressured to sign a severance agreement under duress and argues that the contract is voidable, understand the employee does not have to give the severance money back before filing a Title VII or EPA lawsuit, at least in the Sixth Circuit.

Your Employee Is a Victim of Domestic Violence---What Should an Employer Do?New Zealand parliament recently passed a law granting employees 10 days of extra paid leave each year for victims of domestic violence to change their living situations and not lose their jobs. According to some U.S. statistics, one in four women and one in nine men are victims of intimate partner violence every year. This likely means that someone in your workforce has either suffered domestic violence or has a family member who has. It goes without saying that this type of crime can cause workplace production problems—but what is an employer required to do if an employee is a victim?

FMLA

Under the FMLA, if an employee suffers a physical injury as a result of intimate partner violence, he or she is entitled, as with any other medical condition, to unpaid leave. This would also include intermittent leave. The employee may still be required to provide the required medical certification and would have to meet the eligibility qualifications (i.e., 12 months of work, 1250 hours in the last 12 months, 50 employees at the worksite or within 75 miles).

State Laws

Several jurisdictions also have laws protecting victims of domestic violence:

  • In Florida, employees who work for an employer with 50 or more employees can request and take up to three days of leave per year if the employee or family member of the employee is a victim of domestic violence. The leave may be unpaid, and the employer is required to keep all information about the leave confidential.
  • In North Carolina, an employee is protected from retaliation if the employee takes “reasonable time off” to obtain a protective order or some other sort of relief from domestic violence.
  • In the District of Columbia, employees meeting certain criteria for domestic violence situations may even be entitled to paid leave.

Other states have specific crime victim job protection laws that may cover victims of domestic violence. Mississippi, Arkansas and Alabama have statutes protecting employees’ jobs if they need time off because they are a victim of a crime and have to respond to a subpoena or prepare for court proceedings. Tennessee has a statute protecting state agency employees against adverse employment actions if the employee is helping to prosecute a perpetrator of an offense against that employee.

Company Policies

Many employers have an array of policies that could help employees who disclose a domestic violence issue. You should always check to see what is available, and make sure your employees are aware of their options.

  • Leave – Be sure your employees know that they can take whatever leave applies. It could be characterized as personal, paid time off, vacation, sick, court, or something else.
  • Donated Leave – If you have a way for other employees to donate paid leave, an employee who is the victim of domestic violence may want to ask for consideration.
  • Employee Assistance Programs – Your EAP may provide legal assistance or counseling.
  • Security in the Workplace – Find out whether you should take steps to ensure that the alleged abuser does not cause an issue at work. This could include alerting security or the local police. Some victims may ask if they can bring a gun to work or leave one in their car. While you can follow your company’s policies (and state laws) regarding weapons in the workplace, be sure to fully consider the security of the victim and your other employees.

Common Sense

Since domestic violence is so prevalent in our society, employers should be prepared to deal with the fallout that comes with this unfortunate situation. Beyond physical injuries, there may be post-traumatic stress and mental health issues that arise due to a violent home life. Although you may not be required by law to provide paid or unpaid leave, employers should be mindful that empathy and patience may not only provide some peace to a troubled employee, but also boost the morale and loyalty of the workforce.